Searching for the farthest galaxies in the universe

For physical years, astronomers and amateurs have sought to reveal the mysteries of dark matter and the so-called primitive universe. However, the researcher Paulina Troncoso tells how in 2015 a collaborative work allowed to baptize as TAYNA (Aymara) an object located 4,000 million light years away from Earth.
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TAYNA is located 4,000 million light years away from Earth. / Picture by NASA/ESA/Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
  
Nadia Politis

Report:
Nadia Politis

18, April 2018

Paulina Troncoso knows about teamwork, which in Astronomy is usually a constant. She also enthusiastically recounts the facets of her career, which in 2018 goes from her work as a postdoctoral researcher at Pontificia Universidad Católica, and lecturer by the Teaching in Chile program at the Universidad Autónoma.

After talking about the challenges of lecturing at the School of Business Administration, she recalls how in 2013 she strengthened her training in Astrophysics at Sapienza Università di Roma, Italy. She also talks about her time at the Center for Astrophysics and Related Technologies (CATA) and her current projects in inclusive astronomy. Between the expectation to reach the climax of the story, Paulina takes a pause to not forget any detail about the story behind TAYNA ...

"There was a program from Hubble dedicated to get the most profound images that humanity has obtained, which are 600 Hubble orbits. Imagine, 600 times passing by to get a super deep image", she says.

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Paulina Troncoso, lecturer at Teaching in Chile Program at Universidad Autónoma.

From that pioneering research between Hubble telescopes and NASA's Spitzer, pioneering information emerged in the study of distant objects, also called "weak" objects. It was there when she jumped in: "This is one of the most distant objects and similar to our galaxy. Then we thought in picking a name for it because even with the James Webb Telescope we were not going to be able to observe it because it was far away. Then we called it TAYNA, which in Aymara means "firstborn”.

[SPANISH] “Then we thought in picking a name for it because even with the James Webb Telescope we were not going to be able to observe it because it was far away. Then we called it TAYNA, which in Aymara means "firstborn”.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) called it a "weak compact galaxy" that had emerged in the so-called primitive universe, while other media called it “astronomers discover galaxy that should not exist”. "It was a boom in 2015, it was everywhere, including the metro in France, it was a very good experience and the idea is to continue discovering those types of objects that have that kind of impact, to understand how they were formed". At that time Paulina worked with researchers Leopoldo Infante, Nicolas Laporte, Sam Kim, Stefano Garcia and Franz E. Bauer, and states that the experience  of this project is comparable to the expectations she has about the projects she seeks to develop with the Nucleus of Astrochemistry and Astrophysics (NAQAF) led by Dr. Natalia Inostroza.

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Publication on Twitter of the Spitzer Space Telescope after the discovery.

 

[SPANISH] "James Webb is not a telescope that is dedicated to a particular object. ALMA can do it, and with Chilean time we can achieve that kind of detection. But [for example] to get 10 hours in the James Webb - not only for a Chilean, but also for an American - to observe a single object, it is impossible "

How was the galaxy TAYNA discovered?

[SPANISH]

 Paulina Troncoso, lecturer at the Teaching in Chile Program at Universidad Autónoma.

In deep...
Catalog of galaxies


Paulina points out that among of her projects is the creation of a "catalog of galaxies" that can be used by the research community. "I'm creating a sample of 100 galaxies that are going to be observed by the James Webb space telescope.

Nadia Politis

18, April 2018

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